Ceramic art pieces of Matt Mitros in the Innovative Ceramics exhibit at the Duane Reed Gallery

Photos and reporting by Robert Kokenyesi, Ceramic Artist, Beachfront Pottery, Godfrey, IL, 62035, USA.  If you enjoyed this post, then like the post, and also like my Facebook page.    Check out Beachfront Pottery posts on Instagram @beachfrontpottery.    There is additional information about Beachfront Pottery on my web site.

The Venue

The Innovative Ceramics exhibit took place from January 30 through March 6, 2021 in the Duane Reed Gallery in St Louis, MO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This a picture oft he inner room of the gallery, where all the ceramic pieces were set up.

 

 

 

 

 

The Call for Entry

There was no call for entry, as this was an invitational exhibit.

The Ceramic Art Pieces

“Mug Composition #100” by Matt Mitros.
“Mug Composition #99” by Matt Mitros.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Mug Composition #43” by Matt Mitros.
“Mug Composition #93” by Matt Mitros.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Mug Composition #44” by Matt Mitros.

These pieces have not only ceramic but many other material components to it. Perhaps mixed medium would be a more accurate. Small, colorful creations.

In an interview in Maake Magazine Matt had the following statement: “At the intersection of sentimentalism and kitsch, Mitros’ small scale assemblages pay homage to the aesthetics of pop-culture, architecture, and nature. His arranged abstractions and collaged objects are informed by a desire to illustrate the sublime relationship between the natural and mechanized.”

In an interview in Maake Magazine Matt had the following description of the Mug series. “It’s really about my rejection of material orthodoxy and the pastiche direct appropriation of historical sources which we are taught to draw upon when sourcing our subjects as makers. So many of my artist friends feel a need to pay homage to the great masters of ceramics by being referential to them or to the history of ceramics. Some believe that if it’s made from clay, it needs to be glazed or even fired. I have never struggled with finishing a sculpture because I don’t have the right ceramic glaze. I have found that I can easily paint it, rub it with roofing tar, smear it with concrete, or soak it in beet juice to achieve the desired finish. Ken Price, Ron Nagle, Howard Kottler, and others found a nice balance between knowing the history of the material they were using and understanding that bringing the idea to fruition often required using a different technique not typically associated with the ceramic arts. ”

For more of his works visit his web site.

 

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