Plate & Platter exhibit in Carbondale Community Arts; Part 2 – Modified round pieces

Photos and reporting by Robert Kokenyesi, Ceramic Artist, Beachfront Pottery, Godfrey, IL, 62035, USA.  If you enjoyed this post, then give me a “like” on my Facebook page.      There is additional information about Beachfront Pottery on my web site.

The Venue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The national juried exhibit titled Plate & Platter took place from January 16 through February 22, 2019  Carbondale Community Arts building, Artspace 304.  The exhibit was in collaboration with Southern Illinois University Carbondale’s School of Art and Design Ceramics area.

 

This the starting place with the jurors comments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Call for Entry

Open to all artists 18+ living within the United States. Works must measure no more than 20” in any direction or weigh more than 50 lbs and must be ready for display. Work must be 70% ceramic, completed within the last three years, and address the theme of plate and/or platter.

Plate & Platter 2019 will be the first in a biennial national juried exhibition showcasing functional and sculptural ceramic plates and platters with innovative surface, form, function, and/or concept. This inaugural exhibition will be juried by ceramic artist Chandra DeBuse.

The Ceramic Art Pieces

This post has the round shaped plates and platters where the basic round shape has been altered.

The Best Slice” by Carrie Gibbs, Mount Vernon, IL

 

I couldn’t find a personal web site or an online statement from her.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Composition Plate #1 and Composition Plate #2” by Ryan Caldwell, Missoula, MT

On his web site Ryan states: “I am intrigued by the visual compositions hidden within the environment of everyday life. These references are brief aesthetic moments in time which are recorded in my memory. As I strip down these compositions to their essential elements they become part of a lexicon of formal decisions that are translated onto my utilitarian forms through patterns, colors, and configurations.  am intrigued by the visual compositions hidden within the environment of everyday life. These references are brief aesthetic moments in time which are recorded in my memory. As I strip down these compositions to their essential elements they become part of a lexicon of formal decisions that are translated onto my utilitarian forms through patterns, colors, and configurations. ”

 

 

 

 

“Beehive Betty Platter” by Lyndee Deal, Denton, TX
“Beehive Betty Platter” by Lyndee Deal, Denton, TX

On her web site Lyndee states: “As a woman who has been on some sort of diet since age 12, it was difficult to come to terms with the fact that your body is dependent on another object (or twenty) to fully function. By creating functional pieces specifically made to accompany these un-enjoyable aspects, I intend to make the elements of my routine that I dread, something to look forward to.”  The thick, multilayered base got my attention on this piece.

 

 

 

“Plate” by Betsy Gram, Brooktondale, NY

 

I couldn’t find her personal web site, but on a pottery tour site this is her description: “Straddling the line between functional and decorative, Betsy’s work has an organic and whimsical feel, with ornate surfaces hand-painted with multiple layers of underglaze.”

This plate looks very much 3D  multi-layered, but it’s a well decorated single-sheet plate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Flying Squirrel” by Andrew Davis, Brownsburg, IN
“Flying Squirrel” by Andrew Davis, Brownsburg, IN

On his web site he states: “Artifacts or antique toys inspire many of the forms I make. Inspiration often comes from studying how something is put together or how the surface is wearing off. I aim to capture some kind of dream logic by implying a narrative, but leaving part of the story a mystery. Anthropomorphic animal characters appear in my work to express human extremes of weakness and strength. The animal characters seem at first to be from a familiar story. Recurring character archetypes relate to personal experiences. I combine elements that at first seem to be contradictory and invite the viewer to play with interpretations.”  The second image just to see how he attached the plate to the wall.  I always learn something new.

 

“Platter” by Doug Jeppesen, Sugar Grove, IL

 

 

On his web site Doug shows many nice functional pieces created by wood firing. However, I couldn’t find a statement from him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Ivory Medallion Plate” by Lora Rust, Atlanta, GA

 

On her web site she states: “my goal is to bring a touch of artistry and elegance anywhere in the home. Working in porcelain, my stylized technique is a unique process of pushing the surface of the clay with my personally designed tools, creating lush and fluid surfaces that beg to be touched. Designs and patterns found in Gothic Architecture mixed with the fluidity of Art Nouveau are strong influences for my patterns. Inspiration from textile and fashion design provides movement to the texture on the form. I fire my work in my soda kiln in Blue Ridge, GA. Sodium vapors glaze the exterior of each vessel, interacting and uniquely highlighting the form and surface.”

The slightly pushed-in edge of te plate adds to the surface pattern.

 

 

“Plate with Oak Branch” by Marine Smelik, Palo Alto, CA

 

On her web site she states: “Another material I’m working with is clay. It is almost complete opposite to stone – it is an obedient material that allows me to embody my ideas and always cooperates with me. My works are handbuilt sculptures and pottery. I find clay’s natural color and texture attractive and trying to preserve them in works as much as possible. Glazes are used sporadically and only to highlight or contrast the natural beauty of the material used. Underglaze painting also opens new horizons in working with clay and offered many new possibilities.”

 

 

“Blue Floral Plate” Alexandra Saunders, Rochester, NY

 

 

I couldn’t find a personal web site or an online statement from her.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Hiding Place” by Caro Lynch, Carbondale, IL

I couldn’t find a web site for her.  On an art collective site her description reads: “She continues to explore themes of regionalism, historical context, and social stigma through her application of cobalt oxide to traditional American Stoneware vessels, and the creation of domestic scenes through installation.”

It’s hard to see on my photo that the piano is relief carved.  Also, the strings hanging off the edge of the plate is made of fibrous material, an interesting combination of non-ceramic material in the piece.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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