Construction of a Seafloor Archaeology Teapot ca. 25th century at Beachfront Pottery

Photos and reporting by Robert Kokenyesi, Ceramic Artist, Beachfront Pottery, Godfrey, IL, 62035, USA.  If you enjoyed this post, then give me a “like” on my Facebook page.      There is additional information about Beachfront Pottery on my web site.

The Idea

Have you ever wondered what would 27th century underwater archeologist find from the 25th century?  Exploring those areas that were occupied by humans in the 25th century, but inundated by the expanding oceans in the 27th  century can bring interesting finds.  My best recollection of the 25th century is (from my time traveling helped me to attend a few classes in the 26th and 27th centuries) that folks in the 25th century developed a renewed interest in ceramic items, but long lost the skills to make them.  The 25th century pottery is 100% scavenged from seafloor sediments of earlier time periods, and then clobbered together by nails, yarn, leather straps, copper wire, etc.

My attempts to reconstruct those ceramic items from 27th century underwater archeological digs is the topic of this blog.

The Effort and the Resulting Pieces

 

“Seafloor Archaeology Teapot ca. 25th century” by Robert Kokenyesi, Godfrey, IL
“Seafloor Archaeology Teapot ca. 25th century” by Robert Kokenyesi, Godfrey, IL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Seafloor Archaeology Teapot ca. 25th century II” by Robert Kokenyesi, Godfrey, IL
“Seafloor Archaeology Teapot ca. 25th century II” by Robert Kokenyesi, Godfrey, IL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The above teapots are the final products of this construction post.  Both were made by hand-building fragments of a teapot, and then inserting nails into the fragments to hold the teapot together.

 

Here is my workbench, and you can see the fragments still in the semi-wet clay format.  I used the grey colored white earthenware clay, and the brown colored clay.  The fragments are propped into position by blocks of wax, or bisque pieces, and then holes are drilled for the nails.

 

 

 

Here are the bisque fired fragments with the nails readied for assembly.

 

 

 

This is a partially assembled teapot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is the assembled piece.  Just didn’t have the feel of an archaeology find.

At this point I wanted to find out how the looks changed if I would add clay slurry to the surfaces.  In ziplock bags I made a thin clay solution from brown clay, and immersed the white earthenware pieces, and fired them.

 

 

 

 

This is now the fragments after the treatment with the brown clay solution.

 

 

 

 

 

 I also aged the nails by putting them into a vinegar-containing fluid in a ziplock bag.

 

 

 

 

 

I like the final piece, but I might make another piece without clay solution treatment, but with aged nails.  Also, using terra cotta and red clays will add to the color variations.

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