Ceramic art pieces in the exhibit to honor Susan Bostwic, patron of the arts.

Photos and text by Robert Kokenyesi, Ceramic Artist, Beachfront Pottery, Godfrey, IL 62035, USA.

Between January 6, 2017 and February 3, 2017, the Edwardsville Arst Center hosted an all meda exhibit to honor Susan Bostwick.  She was the recipient of the Edwardsville Arts Center Patron of the Arts award.

“Large Sgraffito Tray” by Marianne Baer.

 

Marianne Baer has been involved in several art forms in the past few decades.  She started out working in ceramics.  The piece on the exhibit looks attractive because it’s simple design and decoration.   Currently she is focusing on upcycling old sweaters into into soft wall art, jewelry and wearables.

 

 

“Untitled 3” by Anne Martin.
“Untitled 1” by Anne Martin.

 

These two small abstract earthenware sculptures were very unique among the exhibit pieces.  I couldn’t find out much about the sculptor, besides that she teaches art in a local high school.

 

 

 

 

“Lean TImes”, “Rabbit Rattle”, and “Baby Bear with Woods” by Jean Lanham-Curvey

 

Jean Lanham-Curvey makes small whimsical clay figurines and rattles.  These are great examples of her work.

 

 

 

 

 

“Owed” by Brandy Cloud.

 

This piece looked like a small monument.  From what I found on the internet Brandy is an art instructor at the Edwardsville Art Center.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Trio of Weird Birds” by Peg Flach.

 

These small birds did look weird because of their shape, and unusually placed eyes.  From my internet search I got hints that she is involved in the Edwardsville area art scene, but nothing more.

 

 

 

“Evolving Double Bowl” by Peg Flach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Mad Hatter” by James Howe.

 

 

This piece is a little different from the mostly raku pieces James Howe.  I remember attending on of James’s raku demonstration in the Missouri Botanical Garden.  On his website James states that he is always in search of the perfect form.. He did very well with this piece.

 

 

 

 

“Pitcher” and “Pescis” by Dan Barnett.

 

The pieces by Dan Barnett are made from a variety of porcelains.  The “Fossil” pieces are my favorites, because of the skeleton-like look of the fish.

 

 

 

 

“Fossil” by Dan Barnett.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Short-Tailed Finch (Finches of the Rainforest Series)” by Richard Wehrs
“Juggler (the State of My Mind)” by Richard Wehrs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Reliquary for Everything That Really Matters in the End (Paraphrasing Ecclesiastes)” by Richard Wehrs.

If I figures it out right, then Richard Wehrs used to work in the Edwardsville area, but since has moved to Minnesota.  His statement tells us the he makes pottery, because he enjoys making it.  His many works are a form of monument building; the act of creating something to be remebered for.

His ceramic pieces include the use of metal leaves, and acrylic paint.

 

 

 

“Untitled” by Andrew Dobson

 

These pieces were interesting, because the ceramic bowls are placed into origami boxes. What an idea!!! I couldn’t find out much about Andrew, unfortunately.

 

 

 

 

“Iron Age Castle – Cornwall” by Elizabeth Adams-Mark

 

I included this piece in a ceramic blog, because the light colored rings are ceramic rings.  The rest of the piece is either cloth or paper (she calls this piece mixed media).  I learned a little bit about Elizabeth through her blog “2ndhandpaper”.  Besides teaching art in a middle school, she is an active part of the paper art scene, and, judging from her blog, she has an appetite for experimenting.  This is a relatively small, but very visually inspiring piece.

 

 

“Canoe and Log” by Melissa Rawson.
“Tall Bottle” by Melissa Rawson.

Melissa has several good looking ceramic vases, tiles and mugs on her web site.  The Tall Bottle on the right was one of the pieces sold in this exhibit. Deservedly so.

 

 

 

 

“Tree Vase” by Ru Ritter.

 

This interesting vase catches your eyes because oft he unusual shape, and the dark and sometime metallic-looking glazes.  I couldn’t find Ru on the internet.  I hope that she continues exploring the vase concepts.

 

 

 

 

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